News

9/15/18 Some of Washington's biggest trees are dying and scientists don't know why. The Chronicle, Centralia/Chehalis, Was., Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018, p. 13. Reports of dying and dead big leaf maple trees have been made for over 10 years. Several agencies and UW graduate student  Jake Betzen are studying the problem.

7/15/18

The Five Springs Tree Farm, owned by the Kingsbury Family, has been named the 2018 Western Region Outstanding Tree Farmer of the Year.  They were the 2017 Washington State Tree Farmer of the Year.  For more information about their property and their management of it, follow this link to the American Tree Farm System's announcement.  They are nominees for the National Outstanding Tree Farmer of the Year for 2018.

7/10/2018

Ken Miller, past WFFA State President, gave a presentation on the Small Forest Landowner Riparian Template Proposal at the Washington Hardwoods Commission Annual Meeting on June 14, 2018.  His entire 25 minute presentation is available for viewing.

2/19/2018

On January 31, 2018, the Washington Department of Natural Resources, brought together its partners -- from local fire districts and volunteer fire teams to the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and National Guard -- at the first Wildland Fire Summit, to work on developing a Wildland Fire Protection Strategic Plan to envision a new future for effective wildland fire management. A fact sheet for the development of the WA Wildland Fire Protection Strategic Plan has now been released.

7/12/2017 Treesource: Forest Journalism for a Sustainable Future

A new online magazine has been started as a way to help the general public understand forests and the work of foresters.  It can be accessed at treesource.org.  The intended audience is the general public and the stories are intended to be more in-depth than the usual daily news story.

1/4/17 New Wood Technology May Offer Hope for Struggling Timer - Cross-laminated timber tested at two mills, Gillian Flaccus and Phuong Le, Associated Press: D.R. Johnson Lumber Co., is one of two U.S. timber mills making a new wood product that’s the buzz of the construction industry. It’s called cross-laminated timber, or CLT, and it’s made like it sounds: rafts of 2-by-4 beams aligned in perpendicular layers, then glued — or laminated — together like a giant sandwich.  The resulting panels are lighter and less energy-intensive than concrete and steel and much faster to assemble on-site than regular timber, proponents say. Because the grain in each layer is at a right angle to the one below and above it, there’s a counter-tension built into the panels that supporters say makes them strong enough to build even the tallest skyscrapers.  “We believe that two to five years out, down the road, we could be seeing this grow from just 20 percent of our business to potentially 60 percent of our business,” said Redfield, D.R. Johnson’s chief operating officer. “We’re seeing some major growth factors.”  Click here for the rest of the story.

7/18/16 - Behind the Tree Farm Sign:  This video was produced in celebration of the 75th Anniversary of the birth of the American Tree Farm Program. The first certified tree farm in the program was located here in Washington state, in Montesano.